Enriching Your Life

A Winter Walk – Do You See What I See?

Winter in Colorado may seem dull and lack luster of any color.  The days are short and we long for the first signs of spring.  But winter has its own charm and if you look close enough you might be surprised what you see.  Grab a camera and take a stroll along the river side or greenbelt or foothills and see the beauty of winter.... Read More

Holiday Wreath Making Instructions

View Our Holiday Wreath Making Video Here: Materials: 1 – 14” Diameter 2-Ring Metal Wreath Form 1 – 24-gauge Floral Paddle Wire (16’ length) Assorted Evergreen Branches 3 – Pre-Wired Pinecones 1 – Decorative Bow Instruction Sheet (video link available on www.plantsbycreekside.com) Tools: Pair of By-Pass Pruners or Sturdy Kitchen Shears Ruler or Measuring Tape Pair of Garden Gloves Container(s) for water to keep greens... Read More

Houseplant Succulent Care

A succulent is a fleshy-leafed plant that is tolerant of drought due to the retention of extra water in the leaves or stems.  Succulent plant varieties include: Sedum Sempervivum Echeveria Aeonium Crassula Aloe Haworthia Cacti In general, the term “succulents” is used to categorize plants that have fleshy parts and a similar need for some water, bright light, and a tolerance of drought. While there... Read More

How to Overwinter Herbs

Homegrown herbs are wonderful to have on hand for culinary purposes, natural beauty recipes, and for their natural healing properties. Just because the cold season is beginning does not mean that you have to say goodbye to your herb garden.  Many herbs can overwinter outdoors if cared for properly. Some hardy herbs do well outdoors in all seasons. For these plants, you can leave them... Read More

Fall Hummingbird Migration

The arrival of hummingbirds in the spring marks a milestone for many of us. But, after the summer nesting season, where do they go? Let us have a look at the fall hummingbird migration and see what these tiny, endearing birds are up to. Hummingbirds are found in the Americas all the way from Alaska to the southern tip of South America, and the Caribbean... Read More

Best Houseplants for Low Light

Adding plants to the house is a favorite way to bring a little lift to any room. Having plants around makes everything feel lighter, brighter, and more alive. Houseplants add color and texture to a room, purify the air, and just look nice. The Biology of Low Light Indoor Plants A handful of tropical, broad-leaf plants are primed for low-light situations through basic biology: large leaves that... Read More

How Soil Makes Your Brain Happy

Soil Microbes Soil microbes have been found to have similar effects on the brain as prozac, without the negative side effects. It turns out getting in the garden and getting dirty is a natural antidepressant due to unique microbes in healthy organic soil. Working and playing in soil can make you happier and healthier. What gardeners and farmers have talked about for millennia is now... Read More

Lavender Growing in Colorado

Lavandula angustifolia is a small shrub native to the Mediterranean, despite its common name of “English lavender”.  Lavender likes cool winters and hot, dry summers reminiscent of its native climate.  It needs well-draining soil and full sun.   Lavender is drought resistant and hardy to zone 5. Different kinds of lavender English – L. angustifolia, most common garden perennial- Munstead, Hidcote French hybrid – L. x... Read More

The Smell of Spring…

Waiting for our spring flowers to pop we often crave the smell of spring.  With the country on restricted activities and sheltering at home, the house may seem musty and stuffy. Creek Side Gardens is here to ignite your senses.  One of the best ways to stimulate your sense of smell is our popular line of Rosy Rings candles. Rosy Rings is located right here... Read More

Daylight Saving Folklore

You might think that daylight saving time was conceived to give farmers an extra hour of sunlight to till their fields, but this is a common misconception. In fact, farmers have long been opposed to springing forward and falling back, since it throws off their usual harvesting schedule. The first real experiments with daylight saving time began during World War I. On April 30, 1916, Germany... Read More